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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of PANIC SITES : THE JAPANESE IMAGINATION OF DISASTER FROM GODZILLA TO AKIRA found in the catalog.

PANIC SITES : THE JAPANESE IMAGINATION OF DISASTER FROM GODZILLA TO AKIRA

Susan J. Napier

PANIC SITES : THE JAPANESE IMAGINATION OF DISASTER FROM GODZILLA TO AKIRA

by Susan J. Napier

  • 190 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Online version of print publication JOURNAL OF JAPANESE STUDIES v.19 #2 (1993) : 327-351.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19498374M

  As Tudors work does not discuss the Akira or Ghost in the Shell I will also use Susan J. Napier’s “Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira.” from The Journal of Japanese Studies which has a broad but detailed examination of Akira and its connection to Godzilla and nuclear destruction. Napier, Susan () "Panic Sites The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira " Journal of Japanese Studies 19 (p. ) 20 As mentioned before, because of the lacking parental figure, this is why this generation cannot fully understand the responsibility entrusted in them. In the narrative Tetsuo and Kaneda are.

  [This course is taught by Prof. Susan Napier, author of Panic sites: The Japanese imagination of disaster from Godzilla to Akira (Journal of Japanese Studies, , Summer ), the first paper on Japanese animation published in an English language academic journal, and Anime from Akira to Mononoke: Experiencing Contemporary Japanese Animation. So, since that first article – Susan Napier’s Panic sites: The Japanese imagination of disaster from Godzilla to Akira appeared back in , what kinds of comments have scholars made identifying particular shortcomings in anime/manga studies?

Napier, Susan J. "Panic sites: the Japanese Imagination of Disaster from ‘Godzilla' to ‘Akira.'" Journal of Japanese Studies (Summer ): OR Film: Fail Safe () [CALL NUMBER: PN FAIL -- VIDEOTAPE]. Satoru Saito, “Detecting the Unconscious: Edogawa Rampo and the Emergence of the Japanese Detective (Harvard University Asia Center, ), April 17 Napier, Susan. "Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira." In Contemporary Japan and Popular Culture, ed. John Whittier Treat. Honolulu: U of Hawai'i P.


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PANIC SITES : THE JAPANESE IMAGINATION OF DISASTER FROM GODZILLA TO AKIRA by Susan J. Napier Download PDF EPUB FB2

Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira From as early aswith the awarding of the Venice Festival Prize to Kurosawa Akira's Rashomon, the Japanese film has been one of Japan's most highly regarded exports.

Since that time, Western art house audiences. Panic sites: The Japanese imagination of disaster from Godzilla to Akira. Add to My Bookmarks Export citation. Type Chapter Author(s) Susan Napier Page start Page end Is part of Book Title Contemporary Japan and popular culture Author(s) John Whittier Treat.

Akira Anime Movie - Film/Cinema Studies bibliographies - in Harvard style. Change style Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira - Journal of Japanese Studies S., Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira.

Journal of Japanese Studies, 19(2), p Website. Neill. Review of 'Manga. Manga. The World of Japanese Comics. The Society for Japanese Studies, [3] Susan J.

Napier. Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira. The Society for Japanese Studies, [4] Unchino Tadashi. Images of Armageddon: Japan's s Theatre Culture. The MIT Press, 2 – Drawing on Susan Sontag’s pioneering essay on science fiction, ‘The Imagination of Disaster’, Napier proposes that Japanese science fiction, like science fiction in general, has had a distinctly dystopian nature, has revelled in ‘the imagination of disaster’ and that Akira represents the Japanese limit case of this revelling.

Released inAkira is a Japanese animated film set in the post-war dystopia of Neo Tokyo in the year31 years after WWIII, which saw the destruction of Tokyo byway of an atomic explosion. The film greatly condenses the source material, altering the story to focus on the struggle between the protagonists, Shotaro Kaneda and Tetsuo.

Hiroshima and two paradoxes of Japanese nuclear perplexity. Critical Military Studies, Vol. 1, Issue. 2, p. this book is not only insightful about Japanese history but also intimates a promising set of inquiries into global memory culture.’ Cold War Orientalism Asia in the Middlebrow Imagination Cited by: Japan Sinks (日本沈没, Nihon Chinbotsu) is a disaster novel by Japanese writer Sakyo Komatsu, published in Komatsu took nine years to complete the work.

The publisher wanted it to be written in two different sections, both published at the same : Sakyo Komatsu. Social Organization in Japanese Middle Schools.

20,1 Lock, Margaret. Ideology, Female Midlife, and the Greying of Japan. 19,1 Mass, Jeffrey P. The Missing Minamoto in the Twelfth-Century Kanto. 19,1 Napier, Susan J. Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from.

Ian Condry "Introduction" to Japanese Hip-Hop book manuscript: "Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira." In Contemporary Japan and Popular Culture. Edited by J. Treat. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, Pp.

Japanese daytime television, popular culture, and ideology / Andrew A. Painter Panic sites: the Japanese imagination of disaster from Godzilla to Akira / Susan J.

Napier Murakami Haruki and Japan today / Aoki Tamotsu. Susan J. Napier, "Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira," The Journal of Japanese Studies, vol. 19, no. 2 (Summer ):. Susan Napier, “Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira,” in Contemporary Japan and Popular Culture, edited by John Treat (Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, ), – Google ScholarCited by: 1.

Napier, Susan J. “Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira.” The Society for Japanese Studies(): Journal Article. This professional journal article discussed the way the Japanese people react socially to the various issues that have happened in their society.

Journal of Japanese Studies, Vol. 19, No. (Summer - AY Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira. Susan J. ing reaches a crescendo as the toys converge on Tetsuo in a savage and. Napier on Susan Napier, “Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira,” Journal of Japanese Studies (Summer ), p.

Online text Author: Joyce E. Boss. Book Description. Japanese popular culture has developed in many unexpected and fascinating ways. From contemporary pop culture’s beginnings in the shadow of the Second World War and the earlier China campaign, Japan’s sense of identity has been contested, challenged, reconsidered, restructured, and revived through multiple popular media.

Susan J. "Panic sites: The Japanese imagination of disaster from Godzilla to Akira." Journal of Japanese Studies ():. Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira p. Murakami Haruki and Japan Today p. Yoshimoto Banana Writes Home: The Shojo in Japanese Popular Culture p.

Contributors p. Index p. Table of Contents provided by Blackwell's Book Services and R.R. Bowker. Used with permission. Contemporary Japan and popular culture. [John Whittier Treat;] and ideology / Andrew A.

Painter --Panic sites: the Japanese imagination of disaster from Godzilla to Akira / Susan J. Napier --Murakami Haruki and Japan today / Aoki Tamotsu --Yoshimoto Banana writes home.

Napier, Susan J. Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira Journal of Japanese Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2 (Summer, ): ."Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira." In Contemporary Japan and Popular Culture, ed. John Whittier Treat. Honolulu: U of Hawai'i P, 5/1 Technology and Modernity: Blade Runner, Metropolis, Akira; read: Philip K.

Dick Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (selection) view:Ghost in the Shell and The Matrix scenes in class; read: “Panic Sites: The Japanese Imagination of Disaster from Godzilla to Akira.”.